Amid a Sea of Vouchers, Road Scholar Offers Cash

0
9

Travel and travel planning are being disrupted by the . This column looks at the companies and organizations that have stood out during this time.

Travel and travel planning are being disrupted by the . This column looks at the companies and organizations that have stood out during this time.

Too often in the pandemic, travelers seeking refunds for vacations they’ve been forced to cancel are instead offered credit for a future trip, whether they want it or not. When The New York Times travel section asked readers to submit their travel cancellation stories, hundreds of email screeds poured in from frustrated customers who were trying to get their money back but have been unable to do so. One reader even did the research to cite which law she believed her travel provider had broken.

Too often in the pandemic, travelers seeking refunds for vacations they’ve been forced to cancel are instead offered credit for a future trip, whether they want it or not. When The New York Times travel section asked readers to submit their travel cancellation stories, hundreds of email screeds poured in from frustrated customers who were trying to get their money back but have been unable to do so. One reader even did the research to cite which law she believed her travel provider had broken.

A bright light in the sea of frustrated missives is , a Boston-based nonprofit travel organization that offers educational trips for travelers 50 and older. Road Scholar began 45 years ago as Elderhostel, offering not-for-credit classes at a handful of universities where the attendees stayed in student dorms. Road Scholar now has 420 employees and organizes 5,500 trips annually for more than 100,000 participants worldwide. Two readers, one scheduled to go to South Korea and another to Greece, wrote in to say how proactively, quickly and generously Road Scholar had acted to offer them a complete refund.

A bright light in the sea of frustrated missives is , a Boston-based nonprofit travel organization that offers educational trips for travelers 50 and older. Road Scholar began 45 years ago as Elderhostel, offering not-for-credit classes at a handful of universities where the attendees stayed in student dorms. Road Scholar now has 420 employees and organizes 5,500 trips annually for more than 100,000 participants worldwide. Two readers, one scheduled to go to South Korea and another to Greece, wrote in to say how proactively, quickly and generously Road Scholar had acted to offer them a complete refund.

Here’s how the company did it.

It moved quickly

Carol Christensen of San Jose, Calif., who is “closer to eighty than seventy,” had planned to accompany five friends on a Road Scholar program in the Greek Islands beginning April 6. With news of the pandemic spreading, the group discussed canceling. Ms. Christensen, who had been on three previous Road Scholar trips, decided to wait and see what the organization would do.

Here’s how the company did it.

It moved quickly

Carol Christensen of San Jose, Calif., who is “closer to eighty than seventy,” had planned to accompany five friends on a Road Scholar program in the Greek Islands beginning April 6. With news of the pandemic spreading, the group discussed canceling. Ms. Christensen, who had been on three previous Road Scholar trips, decided to wait and see what the organization would do.

In early March, Ms. Christensen received an email saying the Greece trip was off, and she was welcomed to a future trip credit or a full refund. “I didn’t have to do anything on my end besides answer a few questions,” she said, noting her credit card was refunded for her final payment, and a check arrived for the deposit she had paid earlier. “They even refunded the cost of the trip insurance.”

In early March, Ms. Christensen received an email saying the Greece trip was off, and she was welcomed to a future trip credit or a full refund. “I didn’t have to do anything on my end besides answer a few questions,” she said, noting her credit card was refunded for her final payment, and a check arrived for the deposit she had paid earlier. “They even refunded the cost of the trip insurance.”

James Moses, Road Scholar’s president, said in an email message that the first responsibility for the nonprofit is to its travelers. While the situation is extremely challenging financially, Mr. Moses believes the community “will stand by us if we stand by them.”

James Moses, Road Scholar’s president, said in an email message that the first responsibility for the nonprofit is to its travelers. While the situation is extremely challenging financially, Mr. Moses believes the community “will stand by us if we stand by them.”

Mr. Moses said that during his 40 years with the company, Road Scholar programs have been disrupted by economic upheavals, natural disasters and disease outbreaks. After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Road Scholar created an emergency response plan and activated it again this year, with teams assigned to communicate with travelers, focus on logistics, monitor the situation on the ground, and keep track of information from government agencies and other sources. Besides communicating with future trip participants, the company helped 670 travelers in 25 countries come home sooner than expected.

Mr. Moses said that during his 40 years with the company, Road Scholar programs have been disrupted by economic upheavals, natural disasters and disease outbreaks. After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Road Scholar created an emergency response plan and activated it again this year, with teams assigned to communicate with travelers, focus on logistics, monitor the situation on the ground, and keep track of information from government agencies and other sources. Besides communicating with future trip participants, the company helped 670 travelers in 25 countries come home sooner than expected.

Even waiting for a cancellation decision can produce anxiety. Gayle Mindes paid a $250 deposit in June of 2019 for a trip to China for this August. The Chicago resident has asked for a refund, but Road Scholar has only canceled trips through July, and is still considering its August trips. The company said Ms. Mindes can transfer her deposit to another trip, or if the trip is canceled, a decision likely to be made in mid-June, Ms. Mindes will receive her deposit back.

Even waiting for a cancellation decision can produce anxiety. Gayle Mindes paid a $250 deposit in June of 2019 for a trip to China for this August. The Chicago resident has asked for a refund, but Road Scholar has only canceled trips through July, and is still considering its August trips. The company said Ms. Mindes can transfer her deposit to another trip, or if the trip is canceled, a decision likely to be made in mid-June, Ms. Mindes will receive her deposit back.

“They say they are following C.D.C. guidelines, but I think there is enough evidence a high-risk group shouldn’t travel,” she said.

“They say they are following C.D.C. guidelines, but I think there is enough evidence a high-risk group shouldn’t travel,” she said.

It’s a nonprofit

With its status as a nonprofit organization, Road Scholar has a cushion that commercial travel operators don’t have. It has received tax-deductible donations over the years that help offset trip planning, help low-income travelers and provide grants for family caregivers. Road Scholar is now launching to ask its community to help the organization during the pandemic.

It’s a nonprofit

With its status as a nonprofit organization, Road Scholar has a cushion that commercial travel operators don’t have. It has received tax-deductible donations over the years that help offset trip planning, help low-income travelers and provide grants for family caregivers. Road Scholar is now launching to ask its community to help the organization during the pandemic.

“We exist to inspire and empower older people,” said Mr. Moses, not to deliver profits to a shareholder. When the travel disruption began, Mr. Moses said he sent a set of “guiding principles” to his employees. The first instruction was “to be kind to people who are calling, recognize their fear and anxiety, and do everything you can to help them,” he said.

“We exist to inspire and empower older people,” said Mr. Moses, not to deliver profits to a shareholder. When the travel disruption began, Mr. Moses said he sent a set of “guiding principles” to his employees. The first instruction was “to be kind to people who are calling, recognize their fear and anxiety, and do everything you can to help them,” he said.

The organization is paying group leaders whose trips were canceled, and working with other providers to get refunds or credit for unused trip activities.

The organization is paying group leaders whose trips were canceled, and working with other providers to get refunds or credit for unused trip activities.

It’s got a loyal customer base

Two-thirds of Road Scholar’s current customers are return travelers, according to the company, including some that have been on more than 25 trips. “The participants build intense relationships because they are on these holistic learning experiences together,” and come back with a feeling of ownership, said Mr. Moses.

It’s got a loyal customer base

Two-thirds of Road Scholar’s current customers are return travelers, according to the company, including some that have been on more than 25 trips. “The participants build intense relationships because they are on these holistic learning experiences together,” and come back with a feeling of ownership, said Mr. Moses.

Ken Gallaher, a retiree from Bartlesville, Okla., has been on 10 Road Scholar trips in the United States, Europe and Asia. He’s a repeat customer, he said, thanks to the programs’ experiences, local lecturers and the company of other curious travelers. He also said that when things go wrong, like mismatched airline schedules, the organization makes it right.

Ken Gallaher, a retiree from Bartlesville, Okla., has been on 10 Road Scholar trips in the United States, Europe and Asia. He’s a repeat customer, he said, thanks to the programs’ experiences, local lecturers and the company of other curious travelers. He also said that when things go wrong, like mismatched airline schedules, the organization makes it right.

From watching the news, he was expecting his April trip to South Korea to be canceled, but when he received a personal call from Road Scholar just one day after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned against nonessential travel there, he was impressed with the organization’s efficiency.

From watching the news, he was expecting his April trip to South Korea to be canceled, but when he received a personal call from Road Scholar just one day after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned against nonessential travel there, he was impressed with the organization’s efficiency.

“They really take responsibility for everything they do,” Mr. Gallaher said.

Mr. Gallaher was offered a full refund, including the plane fare he had booked though Road Scholar. He opted instead to put the money toward an August trip to Europe he had signed up for with his wife, which he hopes won’t be canceled, plus a future trip.

“They really take responsibility for everything they do,” Mr. Gallaher said.

Mr. Gallaher was offered a full refund, including the plane fare he had booked though Road Scholar. He opted instead to put the money toward an August trip to Europe he had signed up for with his wife, which he hopes won’t be canceled, plus a future trip.

Many were happy to take a credit

About half of the nearly 22,000 trip participants that were affected by the March through May cancellations, have opted to “apply their tuition to a future program” in the next three years, according to the company.

Many were happy to take a credit

About half of the nearly 22,000 trip participants that were affected by the March through May cancellations, have opted to “apply their tuition to a future program” in the next three years, according to the company.

  • Frequently Asked Questions and Advice

    Updated May 20, 2020

    • How many people have lost their jobs due to coronavirus in the U.S.?

      have filed for unemployment since March. One in five who were working in February reported losing a job or being furloughed in March or the beginning of April, , and that pain was highly concentrated among low earners. Fully 39 percent of former workers living in a household earning $40,000 or less lost work, compared with 13 percent in those making more than $100,000, a Fed official said.

    • What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

      Common symptoms Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

    • How can I protect myself while flying?

      If air travel is unavoidable, Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

    • Is ‘Covid toe’ a symptom of the disease?

      There is an uptick in which are painful red or purple lesions that typically appear in the winter on fingers or toes. The lesions are emerging as yet another of infection with the new coronavirus. Chilblains are caused by inflammation in small blood vessels in reaction to cold or damp conditions, but they are usually common in the coldest winter months. Federal health officials do not include toe lesions in the list of coronavirus symptoms, but some dermatologists are pushing for a change, saying so-called Covid toe should be sufficient grounds for testing.

    • Can I go to the park?

      Yes, but make sure you keep six feet of distance between you and people who don’t live in your home.

    • How do I take my temperature?

      Taking one’s temperature to look for signs of fever is not as easy as it sounds, as “normal” temperature numbers can vary, but generally, keep an eye out for a temperature of 100.5 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. If you don’t have a thermometer (they can be pricey these days), there are

    • Should I wear a mask?

      The C.D.C. has that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

    • What should I do if I feel sick?

      and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.

    • How do I get tested?

      If you’re sick and you think you’ve been exposed to the new coronavirus, They will decide if you need to be tested. Keep in mind that there’s a chance — because of a lack of testing kits or because you’re asymptomatic, for instance — you won’t be able to get tested.

    • How can I help?

      , which evaluates charities using a numbers-based system, has a running list of nonprofits working in communities affected by the outbreak. You can give blood through the , and has stepped in to distribute meals in major cities.


  • Frequently Asked Questions and Advice

    Updated May 20, 2020

    • How many people have lost their jobs due to coronavirus in the U.S.?

      have filed for unemployment since March. One in five who were working in February reported losing a job or being furloughed in March or the beginning of April, , and that pain was highly concentrated among low earners. Fully 39 percent of former workers living in a household earning $40,000 or less lost work, compared with 13 percent in those making more than $100,000, a Fed official said.

    • What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

      Common symptoms Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

    • How can I protect myself while flying?

      If air travel is unavoidable, Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

    • Is ‘Covid toe’ a symptom of the disease?

      There is an uptick in which are painful red or purple lesions that typically appear in the winter on fingers or toes. The lesions are emerging as yet another of infection with the new coronavirus. Chilblains are caused by inflammation in small blood vessels in reaction to cold or damp conditions, but they are usually common in the coldest winter months. Federal health officials do not include toe lesions in the list of coronavirus symptoms, but some dermatologists are pushing for a change, saying so-called Covid toe should be sufficient grounds for testing.

    • Can I go to the park?

      Yes, but make sure you keep six feet of distance between you and people who don’t live in your home.

    • How do I take my temperature?

      Taking one’s temperature to look for signs of fever is not as easy as it sounds, as “normal” temperature numbers can vary, but generally, keep an eye out for a temperature of 100.5 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. If you don’t have a thermometer (they can be pricey these days), there are

    • Should I wear a mask?

      The C.D.C. has that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

    • What should I do if I feel sick?

      and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.

    • How do I get tested?

      If you’re sick and you think you’ve been exposed to the new coronavirus, They will decide if you need to be tested. Keep in mind that there’s a chance — because of a lack of testing kits or because you’re asymptomatic, for instance — you won’t be able to get tested.

    • How can I help?

      , which evaluates charities using a numbers-based system, has a running list of nonprofits working in communities affected by the outbreak. You can give blood through the , and has stepped in to distribute meals in major cities.


  • Frequently Asked Questions and Advice

    Updated May 20, 2020

    • How many people have lost their jobs due to coronavirus in the U.S.?

      have filed for unemployment since March. One in five who were working in February reported losing a job or being furloughed in March or the beginning of April, , and that pain was highly concentrated among low earners. Fully 39 percent of former workers living in a household earning $40,000 or less lost work, compared with 13 percent in those making more than $100,000, a Fed official said.

    • What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

      Common symptoms Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

    • How can I protect myself while flying?

      If air travel is unavoidable, Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

    • Is ‘Covid toe’ a symptom of the disease?

      There is an uptick in which are painful red or purple lesions that typically appear in the winter on fingers or toes. The lesions are emerging as yet another of infection with the new coronavirus. Chilblains are caused by inflammation in small blood vessels in reaction to cold or damp conditions, but they are usually common in the coldest winter months. Federal health officials do not include toe lesions in the list of coronavirus symptoms, but some dermatologists are pushing for a change, saying so-called Covid toe should be sufficient grounds for testing.

    • Can I go to the park?

      Yes, but make sure you keep six feet of distance between you and people who don’t live in your home.

    • How do I take my temperature?

      Taking one’s temperature to look for signs of fever is not as easy as it sounds, as “normal” temperature numbers can vary, but generally, keep an eye out for a temperature of 100.5 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. If you don’t have a thermometer (they can be pricey these days), there are

    • Should I wear a mask?

      The C.D.C. has that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

    • What should I do if I feel sick?

      and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.

    • How do I get tested?

      If you’re sick and you think you’ve been exposed to the new coronavirus, They will decide if you need to be tested. Keep in mind that there’s a chance — because of a lack of testing kits or because you’re asymptomatic, for instance — you won’t be able to get tested.

    • How can I help?

      , which evaluates charities using a numbers-based system, has a running list of nonprofits working in communities affected by the outbreak. You can give blood through the , and has stepped in to distribute meals in major cities.


  • Frequently Asked Questions and Advice

    Updated May 20, 2020

    • How many people have lost their jobs due to coronavirus in the U.S.?

      have filed for unemployment since March. One in five who were working in February reported losing a job or being furloughed in March or the beginning of April, , and that pain was highly concentrated among low earners. Fully 39 percent of former workers living in a household earning $40,000 or less lost work, compared with 13 percent in those making more than $100,000, a Fed official said.

    • What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

      Common symptoms Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

    • How can I protect myself while flying?

      If air travel is unavoidable, Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

    • Is ‘Covid toe’ a symptom of the disease?

      There is an uptick in which are painful red or purple lesions that typically appear in the winter on fingers or toes. The lesions are emerging as yet another of infection with the new coronavirus. Chilblains are caused by inflammation in small blood vessels in reaction to cold or damp conditions, but they are usually common in the coldest winter months. Federal health officials do not include toe lesions in the list of coronavirus symptoms, but some dermatologists are pushing for a change, saying so-called Covid toe should be sufficient grounds for testing.

    • Can I go to the park?

      Yes, but make sure you keep six feet of distance between you and people who don’t live in your home.

    • How do I take my temperature?

      Taking one’s temperature to look for signs of fever is not as easy as it sounds, as “normal” temperature numbers can vary, but generally, keep an eye out for a temperature of 100.5 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. If you don’t have a thermometer (they can be pricey these days), there are

    • Should I wear a mask?

      The C.D.C. has that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

    • What should I do if I feel sick?

      and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.

    • How do I get tested?

      If you’re sick and you think you’ve been exposed to the new coronavirus, They will decide if you need to be tested. Keep in mind that there’s a chance — because of a lack of testing kits or because you’re asymptomatic, for instance — you won’t be able to get tested.

    • How can I help?

      , which evaluates charities using a numbers-based system, has a running list of nonprofits working in communities affected by the outbreak. You can give blood through the , and has stepped in to distribute meals in major cities.


  • Frequently Asked Questions and Advice

    Updated May 20, 2020

    • How many people have lost their jobs due to coronavirus in the U.S.?

      have filed for unemployment since March. One in five who were working in February reported losing a job or being furloughed in March or the beginning of April, , and that pain was highly concentrated among low earners. Fully 39 percent of former workers living in a household earning $40,000 or less lost work, compared with 13 percent in those making more than $100,000, a Fed official said.

    • What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

      Common symptoms Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

    • How can I protect myself while flying?

      If air travel is unavoidable, Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

    • Is ‘Covid toe’ a symptom of the disease?

      There is an uptick in which are painful red or purple lesions that typically appear in the winter on fingers or toes. The lesions are emerging as yet another of infection with the new coronavirus. Chilblains are caused by inflammation in small blood vessels in reaction to cold or damp conditions, but they are usually common in the coldest winter months. Federal health officials do not include toe lesions in the list of coronavirus symptoms, but some dermatologists are pushing for a change, saying so-called Covid toe should be sufficient grounds for testing.

    • Can I go to the park?

      Yes, but make sure you keep six feet of distance between you and people who don’t live in your home.

    • How do I take my temperature?

      Taking one’s temperature to look for signs of fever is not as easy as it sounds, as “normal” temperature numbers can vary, but generally, keep an eye out for a temperature of 100.5 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. If you don’t have a thermometer (they can be pricey these days), there are

    • Should I wear a mask?

      The C.D.C. has that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

    • What should I do if I feel sick?

      and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.

    • How do I get tested?

      If you’re sick and you think you’ve been exposed to the new coronavirus, They will decide if you need to be tested. Keep in mind that there’s a chance — because of a lack of testing kits or because you’re asymptomatic, for instance — you won’t be able to get tested.

    • How can I help?

      , which evaluates charities using a numbers-based system, has a running list of nonprofits working in communities affected by the outbreak. You can give blood through the , and has stepped in to distribute meals in major cities.


Some participants are eschewing the refund as a gesture of good will, Mr. Moses said. For others, “There’s a feeling of anticipation when you know you are going on a trip” — something that people want to hold onto now.

Some participants are eschewing the refund as a gesture of good will, Mr. Moses said. For others, “There’s a feeling of anticipation when you know you are going on a trip” — something that people want to hold onto now.

While the organization offered a $200 sweetener for Ms. Christensen to take credit for a future trip, the global health situation has put her travel on pause for the time being.

While the organization offered a $200 sweetener for Ms. Christensen to take credit for a future trip, the global health situation has put her travel on pause for the time being.

“Until there is a vaccine, or this thing is really knocked back or treatable, I don’t plan to travel overseas,” she said, “I’m in the high-risk category so I think it will be at least a year until I go abroad again.”

“Until there is a vaccine, or this thing is really knocked back or treatable, I don’t plan to travel overseas,” she said, “I’m in the high-risk category so I think it will be at least a year until I go abroad again.”

Still, she feels grateful for the situation she finds herself. She has friends who received credits from canceled trips organized through other companies, while Road Scholar, for her needs, was “exemplary.”

Still, she feels grateful for the situation she finds herself. She has friends who received credits from canceled trips organized through other companies, while Road Scholar, for her needs, was “exemplary.”

Follow , and .

Follow , and .

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here